Happy New Year 2017


Wow, what a bizarre 12 months 2016 was! It’s like we all stepped into the Twilight Zone where surreal became reality. I’m not sure I’m over it, yet.

That being said, it’s time to take a big breath (really BIG breath, maybe several) and take a peek into the new year of our lives. What do you see? What do you feel? How do you think you will be?

The New Year is always a bit daunting; especially with the way the world is, today. Let’s face it, there’s a lot of crap going on and for the most part, we are powerless to make an impact. However, here’s 5 things you can do as a start to a positive new beginning.

  1. Focus your energy on LOVE, not anger.
  1. Be kinder in a world where there is so much hate, violence and misunderstandings.
  1. Hug someone, today…even if it’s just your pet. 🙂 Pets need our love and support, too.
  1. Reach out to a friend you’ve not spoken to in a while and just ask them how they are doing.
  1. Tell someone you love and appreciate them. It could your mother, or sister or lover or spouse. Maybe it’s your best friend or dad or brother. Maybe it’s yourself. Always save some love for YOU – you need it just as much.

Be brave, my lovelies; I think we’re in for a wild ride but an uplifting one. Let us make a difference, one hug at a time. Let us pass along the positive and the love so that it grows and becomes a force so much stronger than what’s out there, now.

We can do it; I have faith in humanity, one soul at a time.

TONS of love!

Carrie xo

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Turning Fifty


On the eve of my very last day of being in my fourth decade, I can say that it’s been an interesting ten years. A lot of shit went down. Many things (good and bad) happened in my twenties and thirties, too, but for some reason if feels I only really became an adult in the last ten years. I finally grew up and figured out who I was in the world.

It’s not that I was horrible or immature, per se when I was younger, but I definitely was naïve. I approached life events with trepidation or without much pre-planning rather than wonder and forward thinking.

I’ve learned to be so much more grateful for everything. I’ve learned how in a matter of minutes, our lives and what we think we know, can change forever. WE, can change ourselves for the better and for the worse. It’s always a choice.

The last twelve months humbled me beyond words but I think it’s character building, despite the cost and sadness. I choose to take away the good, now, from every experience when I used to dwell, a lot, on the negative.

I’m so very far from perfect (we never truly get there and it’s not about BEING perfect, it’s about the journey) but I’m so very far from the girl I was when I started out all those years ago, too.

My self-confidence has known more peaks and valleys than the beautiful Shropshire Hills in the Midlands of England. I’ve loved and lost and loved again, so many times, I don’t keep track any more. Going forward, I want to treat each new experience of the heart as if it might be the last one. I want to covet it, peel away all of the insecurities and open up myself to vulnerability and bliss at the same time. How else can we truly experience the wonder of love? How else can we really BE in the moment and experience this precious gift we call life?

We all have so many layers.

We all have so many facets, colours and shades of humanity.

I’m an onion girl and when I open up to shed all of the different parts of me you’re left only with my core being.

The Real Me is shining through.

Who is at the core of you?

Remembering the Snow


I was having a conversation with the new man in my life about childhood snow stories. He grew up in Mission, B.C., so although there were times of cold weather, (-13C, respectively) it was a far cry from growing up on the Prairies of Alberta.

I was the kid whose mother dressed her like Kenny from South Park.

All of us looked like that. When the average temperature during the winter months is -13C and when you factor in the wind chill (which blows an average 20KM/h) it’s more like -20C. There were many days when it dipped below the -40C for quite a long time. Again…add in the wind chill and it’s much worse. This was Lethbridge, AB.

Southern Alberta has what they call Chinooks. It’s a native word that means ‘snow eater’. A Chinook is a warm dry, westerly wind that blows in from the Rocky Mountains. It brings with it, not only gusty winds, but very warm temperatures. It can last a few hours or it can last weeks.

We’d get these, Chinooks, off and on throughout the winter and you could see it in the cloud formations called the Chinook Arch. Chinooks would blow in (literally) during all seasons but you’d notice them, more, in winter.

The temperature can go from a damn cold -20C to +18C in a matter of minutes. With it comes, wind gusts from 16K to 100K/h. It’s crazy. I remember one Christmas where it was over +20C.

It’s a high-pressure ridge you can actually see that can cause headaches, earaches and depression. As a child, I just loved the fact that it melted the snow and was warm. When I moved back to Alberta as an adult, it gave me terrible headaches.

In between these strange winds that travelled over the mountains from BC, there was frequently massive amounts of snow. I’m pretty sure we had more snow when I was a kid then they typically have now – global warming and all that.

In fact, I remember one year where we got snowed in. Thankfully we had a ski-do and THAT was a blast! It took us a while to get out the back door, though, as the wind had blown quite a snowdrift up against it.

As kids in winter, snow was our plaything. We’d build forts, tunnels, make snow people, and of course, find the tallest snow pile and claim it for our own. Usually these ‘snow piles’ were at the corner of a block and were the result of snow plows dumping snow from the streets from the entire block. They were HUGE!

Well, when you’re 8-years old or so, they are.

Alberta is dry, really dry. The snow isn’t soft, it hardens into ice-packed lumps so jumping, sliding off of and just plain lying on said snow hills wasn’t exactly comfortable. But – remember, we were dressed in snow suits with additional layers of clothing (think Michelin Man), so it wasn’t so bad landing on jagged pieces of ice sticking out of these snow hills.

Of course seeing as these piles of snow were stationed at the corner of intersections into the street didn’t exactly make them ‘safe’ to play on. But we did it, anyway! I’m surprised none of us were run over by passing motorists.

I remember playing in the frigid cold for hours. I remember my mother smearing cream all over my face so I wouldn’t get chapped skin, then wrapping a massive scarf around my nose and mouth so that all you saw was a pair of brown eyes and a bit of hair peeking out from under my hood. I still recall the smell of Nivea cream and remember the feeling of scratchy scarf sticking to my cheeks and nose.

Trying to run in 4 feet of snow in little-kid snow boots must have looked hilarious. We fell, a lot. My snow mittens didn’t have fingers…so you weren’t so nimble in picking up things. Snowballs were easy, though, and we got good at making them even if we sucked at throwing them.

We left our Christmas house lights lit up at night, all winter. It was constantly windy so blowing snow and ‘white out’ conditions were common. Somehow we got around, anyway. Somehow I made it to school (with the rest of the kids) in -40C +blowing snow weather. It wasn’t often school was closed. Even on these days, we were made to ‘play outside’ during recess and lunch. We survived. We were hardy, prairie kids.

We got colds and the flu just like other kids. We didn’t see green grass until around May ‘ish. Sometimes April if we were really lucky because even after the snow was gone, everything underneath was brown and dead and muddy.

When the snow melted, EVERYTHING was muddy. Alberta has clay-based soil so mud and clay were tracked into every home, every school and we just cleaned it up and lived with it.

I remember finding long stretches of pure ice on sidewalks and roads. These were like gold as taking a run and sliding on it was awesome fun! We didn’t have iPhones, the Internet and digital games, back then. It didn’t matter how friggin’ cold it was, we were made to go ‘outside’ to play. We could barely move due to the layers of clothing, but we didn’t freeze to death, either.

As a kid, winter was kinda fun. I froze my ass off with everyone else, but we made the best of it.

Now, on the Lower Mainland where the grass is always green and frost is rare, I remember what winter can really be like. I don’t miss it; I’ll take the soft grey rainy days over frigid cold, always. But I remember what it was like and I respect those who still choose to be in that environment.

We’re blessed, here. Snow is on the mountains and they’re a short drive away into a beautiful winter wonderland. The ocean is at our front door along with the warm temperate weather.

People bitch when it’s -2C. They need to make a trip to the prairies where it’s -35C and taking in a deep breath of that frozen air actually hurts your lungs.

Appreciate where you came from; be grateful for where you are.

Happy New Year.

Grouse Mountain New Years Eve 2015Grouse

Hello 2016


I don’t think I’ve ever been so glad to bid an entire 12 months adios. That being proclaimed, there were some interesting, noteworthy and positive highlights that are not related to my beloved late boyfriend and all the sorrow that went along (and is still going along) with that. To say it was hard, to say it was painful only scratches the surface of a festering open and bleeding wound.

Let’s list some good things that happened in 2015 and be thankful, shall we? In no particular order:

  1. Financially, I’ve had the best year ever. So, that’s something.
  2. I survived! Truly, this was possibly the worst year of my life, but I made it. I’m broken and I think my poor heart has seen much better days, but I’m alive and healing, little by little.
  3. I’ve learned a lot about love, life and myself. I’ve come a long way from the woman who thought she was doing ‘okay’, in Jan. 2015. I now know better. I now know I’ve much more to learn and much growing to do in so many positive ways.
  4. I went to visit my best friend in Australia! It didn’t fix me; I still had my daily cry over Bri…but I had a blast, anyway! I will return and I hope she comes to visit me, soon, in Canada.
  5. Despite having kidney failure, due to the wonderful medicine (and lots and lots of LOVE), my fur baby (and best kitty friend EVER) is doing well! I’m blessed to still have him at almost 14-years.
  6. I met someone exceptionally nice and although it’s new, there is a care-factor. I have no idea if love will surface but he’s devoted and spends a lot of quality time with me. This speaks volumes. He’s never ‘too busy’ and I think if there were something that I really needed to count on him for, he’d be there.
  7. I lost friends (by choice) but I made new friends (by choice). I think I’m better off by choosing to let go of some who don’t fit inside my world and let in others who do.
  8. I’ve gone back into learning spiritual healing techniques and how have my level II traditional Japanese Reiki. I’ll also be checking out Seichem.
  9. I got better at my climbing techniques. Yes, this counts. Try it if you think it’s easy, ‘cause it’s not.
  10. I’ve committed to daily meditation and actually love it. It’s grounding, healing and helps me connect to Spirit.

Learn to just ‘be’.

Be yourself. Be happy. Be loved. Be okay with stuff. Be good. Be ready …for everything and anything, you can never know what curveballs life will throw at you. Be safe (as in, don’t be stupid). Be lovING. Be truthful and grateful.

Be the best YOU, you can be. Happy New Year.

Peace & Love. xo

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